World of Warcraft, 08.03.2017

Players Banned For Selling Real-Money Raids And Dungeons

Blizzard has banned several players for violating WoW’s Terms of Use and selling in-game clears for real-world money. The ban affects several top-guilds.

Rumor has it, that the bans have a duration of eight days in most cases. This is quite a mild penalty and should be considered as a warning. Professional boosting is a long grown and lucrative business for those players: A full Nighthold Mythic clear costs around €1.500, depending on who you ask.

Blizzard made clear that they will take a much closer look on these activities in the future and that selling clear-runs for in-game gold is totally fine though.

Full Blizzard Statement

We’ve recently taken action against a number of accounts that were actively participating in and/or advertising the sale of in-game raid or dungeon clears in exchange for real-world currency. Such behavior is a clear violation of the World of Warcraft Terms of Use.

Of the players affected, many were members of top raiding guilds. We want to be clear that everyone we’ve taken action against had illustrated full knowledge and intent to violate the Terms of Use. Going forward, in order to ensure fair play and competitive integrity, we’ll be monitoring these activities much more closely in order to make sure that the rules are being followed. This includes selling services for real money, account-sharing, and other violations.

Note that while selling assistance with obtaining items, achievements, PvP rating, or other in-game benefits for real-world currency is against the Terms of Use, selling those things in exchange for in-game gold is perfectly legitimate. Players should not feel as though participating in a “gold run” is going to result in negative action taken against their account.

If you see people advertising these services, please help us keep the game clean by reporting them. If you’re unsure, here are some common warning signs:

  • A “broker” is offering to match buyers with service-providers. Commonly, a broker will collect real-world currency from a buyer while offering gold to a guild or group that will actually provide the service.
  • Someone offering a service is unwilling to discuss terms of payment via in-game tells, and insists on using a non-Blizzard application to communicate.

Also note that Patch 7.2 includes some improvements to our reporting features to add clearer categories for reporting listings in the Premade Group Finder. We’re disappointed to see members of the raiding community participating in behaviors that clearly violate the Terms of Use, and want to be clear that such activities will not be tolerated.

Source: Bluepost on the forums

  • Corey Lyman

    Haofine – Veknilash was doing it tonight on Vek